Camille Claudel in the shadow of Rodin and abuse by her mother

For the writer Octave Mirbeau, Camille Claudel was the "most brilliant woman of her time" . Born in 1864 in Aisne, the young Camille began to work the land very young, encouraged by her father. At 12, she was spotted by sculptor Alfred Boucher, dazzled by a sculpture of David and Goliath. Encouraged by her mentor, Camille Claudel went to live in Paris to study at the Colarossi mixed academy. With other women artists from England, she opened a workshop to practice. Alfred Boucher then praised the work of his protege to the famous Auguste Rodin. The latter hired her, in 1884, as an apprentice and then a practitioner in his workshop. In the shadows, the young woman works on the preparation of" The Door to Hell" . Gradually, the student takes more space in the professional and personal life of the artist. In the intimacy of the studio, a love story is born. But at this time, Auguste Rodin already shares his life with Rose Beuret and will always refuse to marry his young mistress. Camille Claudel feeds the inspiration of Rodin, who regularly takes her as a model. They work together and influence each other, sculpting on the same subjects. Although Rodin favors Camille from his Parisian network, criticism is directed at him. It is judged that her work is too similar to that of the sculptor, or even that she copies it. Camille feels the need to emancipate herself, to extricate herself from the influence of her famous lover. In 1888, she settled alone in her own studio and produced subjects that belong only to her. She perfects her style and thrives in the sculpture of nudes. Love, anger, despair is formed under Camille's tools, borrows from the expressionist movement. From these years are born these greatest masterpieces:, La Valse or L'Age Mûr . After ten years of a tumultuous relationship, Camille Claudel and Auguste Rodin separate. Twenty-four years his junior, Camille will not have obtained a coveted marriage and would have undergone several abortions during this period. A real curse, the rupture makes the young artist gradually fall into paranoia. She is convinced that Rodin imagines plots against her and her work which, during her lifetime, will never be a resounding success. In desperation and rage, she destroys many works, despite hard work. The story of Camille Claudel is a drama in two acts. In 1913, the artist's father died, without her being informed. The next day, her mother, who has never supported her, forced her to be interned for her "madness". Camille had become "cumbersome" for her family: too independent, too whole, perhaps. The artist is dark and no longer creates. She will not receive any visits from her mother and sister. Her brother Paul categorically refused to allow a room to be opened at the future Rodin museum to exhibit his sister's work, and only came to see her ten times in 30 years of internment. Her family refuses her requests to leave and no one will put an end to this imprisonment. Her mother will write about her daughter one day: "I'm very happy to know where she is, at least she can't harm anyone". Camille Claudel died in 1943 of malnutrition and was buried in a mass grave. The sculptress fell into oblivion until 1988 with the making of the eponymous film "Camille Claudel" by Bruno Nuytten, with Isabelle Adjani in the main role. In 2017, a first museum in her name was created in Nogent-sur-Seine, where the artist lived. Neon Magazine - Lisa Black Video: The Camille Claudel Tragedy

Camille Claudel in the shadow of Rodin and abuse by her mother

For the writer Octave Mirbeau, Camille Claudel was the "most brilliant woman of her time" . Born in 1864 in Aisne, the young Camille...